Heartbreak.

connieanony:

One of the greatest tragedies to me is when parents come to eat lunch with their kids at school and stay on their phone the entire time. It breaks my heart every. single. time.

I just want parents to know that the best, most valuable gift they can give to their kids is the gift of their complete 100% undivided time.  They need it more than most parents realize.

You seriously just hit home for me. I tell my mother this all. the. time. My dad passed away a little over a year ago, and my 10 year old brother isn’t taking it well. Seeing them at the dinner table with her on the phone (texting or facebook…clearly not important) and him just sitting there eating quietly. It pisses me off. That’s how I know that when I’m a teacher, my students will get my undivided attention every. single. opportunity. that I have to give them, because they don’t all get that at home. 

It's that easy.

  • Me: The only tone I want to hear along with the word "gay" in this classroom is pride. If you use it as a joke or as an insult you might as well start walking yourself to the door, close it behind you, and wait for my one-on-one lesson that I promise, you will never forget.
  • *Bell Rings* *Class is Dismissed* *Student Lingers*
  • Student: Miss I just want to say that I really appreciate you not letting everyone use "gay" that way.
  • Me: I appreciate YOU.
  • It's that easy guys. Really. It's that easy.
Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything. Scott Woods (via azspot)

(via msformel)

I can’t tell you how important this is to me, especially seeing the cast of Law and Order SVU participating in this campaign. They have been an inspiration to me, especially Mariska Hargitay. She is such a strong woman, and watching her on the show gives me hope that there are people who care what happens to people who are victims of violence. For more information, you can go here: http://nomore.org/

ukulelerave:

such a needed campaign. i wish they’d have included native americans as well, though, as cultural appropriation of them in costumes is just as awfully common.

(via thedarkirishsilence)

mydollyaviana:

disneyismyescape:

carry-on-until-its-gone:

wish-upon-the-disney-star:

This scene is SO important. Maleficent is with someone she trusts, someone she considers a friend. And then the next thing she knows, she wakes up in pain, bleeding, with her wings burned off. A huge part of her has been destroyed.

Rape is so prominent in our culture that it is in a Disney movie. Maybe not explicitly, but it is very clear what this scene represents and it is so sad.

I fucking cried my eyes out during this scene

AJ even confirmed that this is what this scene was a metaphor for (x) - just because i saw someone say today that this is not what this scene is about

'We were very conscious that it was a metaphor for rape': The actress explained how the scene in which her character has her wings ripped off her body while in a drug-induced sleep had to be something 'so violent and aggressive' that it would make her 'lose all sense of her maternity, her womanhood and her softness' 

when a man violates a woman, he cuts off her wings.

(via adventuresofastudentteacher)

teachnologies:

What an Effective Teacher’s Classroom Looks Like
This isn’t the most surprisingly list persay, but it’s interesting to see everything laid out. Here are a few from the effective teacher portion of the list:


Lessons are inviting and exciting.
The students do most of the talking and the doing, prompted by the teacher’s questioning and guidance.
Routines and procedures are evident. Students know exactly what is expected of them.
There are no teacher warnings for student misbehavior. If a rule is broken, a consequence follows. If a procedure isn’t followed, the teacher provides more practice.

teachnologies:

What an Effective Teacher’s Classroom Looks Like

This isn’t the most surprisingly list persay, but it’s interesting to see everything laid out. Here are a few from the effective teacher portion of the list:

  • Lessons are inviting and exciting.
  • The students do most of the talking and the doing, prompted by the teacher’s questioning and guidance.
  • Routines and procedures are evident. Students know exactly what is expected of them.
  • There are no teacher warnings for student misbehavior. If a rule is broken, a consequence follows. If a procedure isn’t followed, the teacher provides more practice.

(via msformel)

thinkbrit:

girlwithalessonplan:

Every teacher.  Every day.

I may have turned to The Boy at this line and been like, “That. I want to say that to all my kids all the time.”